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The life and music of Vera Lynn in WW 2

Dame Vera Margaret Lynn (nee Welch), born in 20 March 1917, in East Ham, Essex, England, was widely referred to as the “Forces’ Sweetheart” during World War 2. She was an English singer, songwriter and entertainer, who were part of the Entertainments National Service Association (ENSA) which gave outdoor concerts for the troops. Here, we remember the life and music of Vera Lynn, who shone a light through her voice, in the midst of war. John Eilermann

Image source: telegraph.co.uk

Vera Lynn began singing, touring men’s clubs at the age of 7. But it was only at the age of 11 when Vera went to adopt her grandmother’s maiden name (Lynn) as she joined the singing troupe Madame Harris’s Kracker Kabaret Kids. In 1935, Vera Lynn had an opportunity to sing with the Joe Loss Orchestra in what would be her first radio performance. Two years later, in 1937, Lynn recorded her first hits “The Little Boy Santa Claus Forgot” and “Red Sails in the Sunset.” John Eilermann

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Lynn’s popularity during the war began when she would sing to people who were using the London’s tube station platforms as air raid shelters. Vera Lynn’s name came on top of a list of favorite performers as a result of a survey of British servicemen. She continuously performed with her quartet, doing songs most requested by soldiers. Her wartime hits include “We’ll Meet Again” and the “White Cliffs of Dover.” John Eilermann

Vera Lynn continued to perform even after the war. In 1969, Lynn became an Officer of the Order of the British Empire (OBE), and in 1975, was created a Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire (DBE). She wrote three memoirs – Vocal Refrain (1975), We’ll Meet Again (1989; with Robin Cross & Jenny de Gex), and Some Sunny Day (2009). Vera Lynn died in 18 June 2020 at the age of 103. John Eilermann

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Why the habit of reading is essential for any writer

It’s only natural that that those who love to read can explain their thoughts well through writing. Over the past two decades however, children have become more inclined to use gadgets, getting into gaming, and forsaking reading. And while some gaming apps can actually promote reading, nothing can really beat sitting down and reading a book. John Eilermann St. Louis.

Image course: edutopia.org

Everyone must develop or redevelop a love for reading, as this skill improves other skills such as writing and comprehension. Those who have an appreciation for reading may find that writing would come natural to them.

In reading, one learns how to understand the subject matter and retain the material read. Over time, one’s understanding and memory are improved through habitual reading. John Eilermann St. Louis.

Image source: medium.com

Having said all of this, people have to understand that there really isn’t a more efficient and sure-fire way to get good at writing than to actually write. However, reading exposes one to various writing styles, other voices, and different genres and forms of writing, enhancing one’s writing skills. Reading also reminds a writer that there is always room for improvement. John Eilermann St. Louis.

Regularly making the time to read allows a person to become a better writer and even a better talker. As people can see, the benefits of reading go beyond just enjoying a book. So, what are you waiting for? Grab that hardbound copy you’ve been putting off, and go finish a chapter. John Eilermann St. Louis.

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History buffs’ corner: A look at some of the most famous guns in history

Image source: world.guns.ru

Over the centuries, mankind has seen some of the most destructive wars in history. And from these massive armed conflicts, there have been some legendary items of interest that still fascinate history buffs. John Eilermann.

In today’s blog, we take a look at some of the most iconic firearms in the history of war.

1. The Greaser

This famous firearm gets its name from its appearance – it looks a lot like the grease gun of a mechanic. It’s popularity stems from its simplicity, affordability, and reliability. American soldiers used the Greaser extensively toward the end of World War 2. John Eilermann.

2. The Lee-Enfield

Many decades before the Greaser came to be, there was the Lee-Enfield. A rifle that British soldiers utilized since the Napoleonic Wars, the Lee-Enfield was ideal for rapid-fire strategies and stayed with the Brits until the 1900s. John Eilermann.

Image source: world.guns.ru

3. The STEN

The STEN was a submachine gun and used the same bullets as the Lee-Enfield. While not the most eye-pleasing firearm out there, it was quite the effective and efficient weapon during the early part of World War 2. Very few other guns were used as extensively. John Eilermann.

3. The AK-47

Created by Mikhail Kalashnikov, the AK-47 is one of the most recognizable and iconic guns in human history. It is extremely easy to use and very powerful, as well as resistant to water, dirt, and jamming. Many people still use it today.

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All you need to become a productive reader

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Reading is a skill taught in the early years in school. While reading is a skill used in daily life, many make a living out of it. Productive reading allows people to read for work, leisure, and learning. Like any muscle, reading has to be practiced and exercised in order for it to be in good form. John Eilermann St. Louis.

Read with a pen in hand. Underlining words one does not understand helps them process the meaning later on. When one is done reading the book, going through all the underlined words allows one to reprocess the words and their meanings. Allot more time for reading, even if it is as little as 10 minutes. Borrowing time from less important activities can make one a more productive reader. John Eilermann St. Loius.

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Journal new words and phrases learned from a book. A generous activity, reading offers one new nuggets of knowledge every time they reach for a book. Don’t be afraid to let go of books midway. If a book fails to teach or impart any lesson or give any fresh thought, it’s okay to drop it and move on to the next one. John Eilermann St. Louis.

Random is good. Many follow a genre and stick to it for a chunk of their lives, while some enjoy a good variety of topics, authors, and genres. While picking up a book at random won’t seem to increase a reader’s productive, it sure will pique their interest or help them determine which stories and topics to gravitate to. John Eilermann St. Louis.

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Five baseball drills to do on your own

One of America’s most treasured sports, baseball, has been a part of most households since its inception. Since the world is still far from being safe, baseball players should stay in shape while staying out of crowded places. Here are five baseball drills to do at home. John F. Eilermann Jr.

Image source: sportsengine.com

Quick ladder drills ensure that a baseball player’s feet are quick and their whole body agile when sprinting from the batter’s box or zooming toward fly balls. There is no reason to skip footwork training. Backward lunges with a twist help form and strengthen the back muscles. The exercise effectively reduces back injuries while giving the hip flexors a better range of motion. John F. Eilermann Jr..

Image source: greatist.com

The alternating lateral lunge with overhead reach enhances a player’s stability, correcting any imbalance in their muscles. The workout builds mobility and encourages the better transfer of power while improving one’s catching skill. Prone planks strengthen the back and core muscles. In addition, incorporating prone planks in the workout ensures increased stability and balance, which are two incredibly important qualities in baseball players. John F. Eilermann Jr..

Brush up on proper throwing mechanics by practicing staying on target with every toss. While in different positions, maintain the same target to sharpen the skill of throwing. Be sure to keep the movement flawless and fluid with every throw to increase efficiency and effectiveness. Staying in shape can be a challenge during this season, but there should be no excuse not to improve. John F. Eilermann Jr.