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Five baseball drills to do on your own

One of America’s most treasured sports, baseball, has been a part of most households since its inception. Since the world is still far from being safe, baseball players should stay in shape while staying out of crowded places. Here are five baseball drills to do at home. John F. Eilermann Jr.

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Quick ladder drills ensure that a baseball player’s feet are quick and their whole body agile when sprinting from the batter’s box or zooming toward fly balls. There is no reason to skip footwork training. Backward lunges with a twist help form and strengthen the back muscles. The exercise effectively reduces back injuries while giving the hip flexors a better range of motion. John F. Eilermann Jr..

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The alternating lateral lunge with overhead reach enhances a player’s stability, correcting any imbalance in their muscles. The workout builds mobility and encourages the better transfer of power while improving one’s catching skill. Prone planks strengthen the back and core muscles. In addition, incorporating prone planks in the workout ensures increased stability and balance, which are two incredibly important qualities in baseball players. John F. Eilermann Jr..

Brush up on proper throwing mechanics by practicing staying on target with every toss. While in different positions, maintain the same target to sharpen the skill of throwing. Be sure to keep the movement flawless and fluid with every throw to increase efficiency and effectiveness. Staying in shape can be a challenge during this season, but there should be no excuse not to improve. John F. Eilermann Jr.

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Train like a baseball player: Three workouts worth trying

John Eilermann St. Louis. Baseball is one of the most beloved sports in the US. Baseball players have to undergo intense physical training to improve their speed, force, and mobility. Here are three tried and tested workouts for those who want to be in shape like the MLB pros.

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Kettlebell Turkish get-ups

John Eilermann St. Louis. Considered by trainers as one of the best workouts, this routine originally done by Turkish wrestlers can improve the strength, endurance, and range of motion of athletes. As one lays flat on their back, they should hold the kettlebell straight over their head and try to stand up. According to trainers, it is one of those workouts that tone and strengthens the core, hips, and shoulder, which are important for baseball players.

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Bulgarian split squat

John Eilermann St. Louis. This move targets the quadriceps, glutes, hamstrings, calves, abdominals, and spinal erectors. Compared to the usual squat that can put pressure on the lower back, this split squat focuses on the legs, which is suitable for those who usually experience back pain. To do this exercise, find a chair or a bench. Do a comfortable lunge where one can still do a squat. Ensure the knee doesn’t touch the toes, and the upper body should be in a position that won’t put extra pressure on the shoulders and neck.

Swiss exercise ball with cable rotations

For this exercise, hold the fitness ball up to the chest with the rope handle on the other side. Bend slightly and pull the rope with the outside hand while holding on to the ball. This exercise aims to strengthen the core and develop a player’s throwing power. Experts also say that this can also improve an athlete’s speed and flexibility. John Eilermann St. Louis.

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A-Rod: From successful slugger to excellent commentator

Baseball fans around the world are divided when it comes to liking Alex Rodriguez, or A-Rod, as many call him. The slugger has had one too many controversies surrounding his career that he was considered an outcast on the field. The former Yankee turned himself from a noteworthy slugger to a beloved commentator. John F. Eilermann Jr.

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Many successful professional athletes have ventured into the world of broadcasting following a career in professional sports. Not all of them proved to be as proficient on screen as they were in their sport. A-Rod has been breaking records since the beginning of his career and still proves to be the man to beat now that he has traded his bat for the microphone. John F. Eilermann Jr.

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The athlete-preneur became a studio analyst for Fox Sports not long after he retired. The 2018 season saw him at the top of the network’s list to become part of its Sunday Night Baseball broadcast. The star baseball player was lined up with veterans in the booth analyst Jessica Mendoza and Matt Vasgersian. While fans were shocked by how well A-Rod was able to flow with the two, others were quick to note that Sunday Night Baseball was too focused on him. John F. Eilermann Jr.

The slugger-turned-commentator has improved since his first time on air. His commentary now sounds more confident and less scripted. Outside of baseball, A-Rod maintained his own show, “Back In the Game” where he helped celebrities build their net worth back up after falling on hard times. Rodriguez guest stars on “Shark Tank” and streams his own podcast and YouTube vlog. John F. Eilermann Jr.

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Home workouts for baseball players

In some parts of the world, fitness gyms won’t be opening anytime soon as social distancing and disinfecting measures would be difficult to maintain in such areas. Athletes around the world have turned their living rooms, bedrooms, and lawns into their personal gyms. John Eilermann.

It might take a while before baseball players can train on the diamond again. Nonetheless, training must never stop. Take this time to improve your agility. Footwork drills like sprints, fast feet, and workouts using the agility ladder can help a baseball player’s agility on the diamond. Quick reaction time is incredibly important in baseball, especially in making hard plays look smooth. Drills that teach one to stop, start, and change direction quickly can be done in the living room or the yard. Cone drills improve athleticism and enhance coordination skills. John Eilermann.

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The Shuffle Drop Drill develops footwork, endurance, and change of direction. To do the drill at home, get two buckets or cones, and six baseballs. The space needed for the workout is five to eight feet. If you’re fortunate enough to have a throwing partner, warm up by doing a throwing progression. While at home, focus on establishing a foolproof throwing protocol to get the most out of the workouts. John Eilermann.

Incorporating a few bodyweight exercises can help build muscles and get the heart rate up. Be sure to cool down after every training session at home to prevent muscles from overstretching or tearing. John Eilermann.

 

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Kids and baseball: The proper age to get started

Many parents allow their kids to take part in sporting activities to develop their motor skills. Some encourage them to pick a sport to master and someday become an athletic scholar for high school and college. Is there really a right age for one to get started in a sport if they want to become a pro? John Eilermann.

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Cultivating talent isn’t as easy as teaching a kid how to walk or blow a candle on their first birthday. For some, spotting talent comes before enrolling a child for proper training, while for others, it’s the other way around. Baseball is a well-known and beloved sport in the U.S. When it comes to having a child experience a glove and ball, there really isn’t a “right” age. John Eilermann.

Focus is a tough thing to teach to kids age four and below. Baseball is a sport that requires attention and focus on the pitch and hit. Children four and below should be taught motor skills involved in the sport. When they reach the age five or six, focus can be added to their lessons. John Eilermann.

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In general, kids age five and up are already in kindergarten where they are taught discipline, structure, and teamwork. It is also the typical age for them to start joining age groups and recreational leagues. At age seven, kids can join organized baseball, and at eight, they can start training with a team. If a child desires to become a successful baseball player in the future, their parents and coaches can start molding them to become a champion by the age of nine. John Eilermann.